Patient Leaflets

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Abdominal Hysterectomy ERP

You have been offered an abdominal hysterectomy because conservative or medical treatment of your problem has failed or is unsuitable.

Abdominal hysterectomy is most commonly used in the treatment of:

  • menorrhagia (heavy bleeding) and/or dysmenorrhoea (painful periods).
  • fibroids (non-cancerous growths) that grow in the wall of the uterus.
  • Endometriosis.
  • cancer (womb, cervix. ovary, fallopian tubes, vagina).
  • chronic pelvic inflammatory disease.
  • ovarian cysts.
 
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Chronic Pelvic Pain

Pelvic pain is any pain you feel in the lower abdomen or pelvis. Healthcare professionals consider pelvic pain to be long-term if:

  • you experience it either constantly or intermittently for at least six months
  • it happens at times other than when you have your period or sexual intercourse.

Chronic or long-term pelvic pain is very common. Almost one in six women suffers from pelvic pain that has been going on for more than 6 months. Unfortunately, many women will suffer for years before a diagnosis is made.

 
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Endometriosis

Endometriosis is where tissue similar to the lining of the womb grows outside the womb, on the lining of inside of pelvis, on ovaries, bowel and many other organs. The cause is not known. Research shows that on average, it takes 7 years from the time of onset of pain to diagnosis.

Sometimes there are no symptoms and it is found by chance when a woman is having an operation. However, for many women it can be a very painful condition and it is diagnosed when these symptoms are investigated. In other cases it is identified in women who are having difficulty getting pregnant.

 
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How to recover quickly from a laparoscopy

A laparoscopy (also known as keyhole surgery) is performed under a general anaesthetic. 3-4 half to one centimetre cuts are made in the abdomen which allows your surgeon to insert a small telescope so that he can see inside your abdomen and your reproductive organs directly. Your abdomen will be filled with gas to allow us some space to gain a clear picture and if necessary to treat any problems as agreed with you before your operation. Before you agree to surgery and sign your consent a surgeon will discuss what is planned (This is called an informed consent).

At the end of surgery as much gas as possible is released from the abdominal cavity and the incisions are closed.

 
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Laparoscopic Hysterectomy ERP

You have been offered a laparoscopic hysterectomy because conservative or medical treatment of your problem has failed or is unsuitable.

Laparoscopic hysterectomy is most commonly used in the treatment of:

  • menorrhagia (heavy bleeding) and/or dysmenorrhoea (painful periods).
  • fibroids (non-cancerous growths) that grow in the wall of the uterus.
  • Endometriosis.
  • chronic pelvic inflammatory disease.
  • ovarian cysts.
 
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Pre-Operative Bowel Preparation for Gynaecological Laparoscopic Surgery

Prior to your admission for laparoscopic surgery, we would like to ensure that your bowel is completely empty as this makes surgery easier to perform and reduces the risk of bowel injury to you. In the unlikely event of this occurring, it makes the management much easier as there is much less risk of contamination. It does, however, mean that you will have to go on a special diet for two days prior to your surgery and then take a strong laxative. The laxative will be given to you at your Preadmission assessment appointment together with instructions.

 
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Vaginal Hysterectomy ERP

Vaginal hysterectomy is most commonly used in the treatment of uterine (womb) prolapse. A prolapse of the uterus occurs due to a weakness in the supporting tissues to the vagina. This weakness can cause symptoms of a bulge that appears from the vagina. It is usually worse on straining, walking and lifting. Commonly symptoms are worse in the evening.

Vaginal hysterectomy is also used in the treatment of women with menorrhagia (heavy bleeding) and/or dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) and small benign fibroids (non-cancerous growths) that grow in the wall of the uterus.